Halloween Photography Ideas: Get Ready to Trick or Treat

Autumn is such an amazing season for vibrant, colorful photography! Now that the Halloween is just around the corner, it is about the right time to impress your viewers with some new photo tricks. Without further introduction, here are the Halloween photography ideas and tips we want to share with you. Don’t forget to spread the enthusiasm!

Eye the Wow Factor: Shoot a Halloween Parade

The beauty of this celebration is that everyone will dress-up.  Ghosts, witches, goblins, and monsters of all kinds will pervade the streets, all smiling and ready to be photographed. All you need for fantastic, memorable shots is to get out there with your camera in hand and see what tickles your imagination. Ghostly, spontaneous portraits are allowed. This is a simple point and shoot strategy. Photograph a Halloween parade and have some fun.

Halloween photography ideas shooting a parade

New York’s Village Halloween Parade, 2014

Capture the Atmosphere: The Challenge of Shooting in Dim Light

Shooting in low light settings is a real challenge if you are not well-equipped. A good DSLR can do the trick for you with a few adjustments, but if it lacks image stabilization, we recommend mounting low light, fast lenses.

However, there are a few tricks you can do and catch the Halloween feeling in your shots without employing extra equipment. Halloween photography should be all about having fun, not carrying around heavy gear.

Here’s what you can do to improve the accuracy of your images when shooting in dim light:

  1. Most cameras come with a Night Mode that allows you to capture your subjects in detail, and emphasize the setting at the same time. The disadvantage, though, is that, if your subjects don’t remain still, the images will get blurry.
  2. What you can do best is take full control of your camera settings. Start by selecting a high ISO speed (400 or more). The downside of doing it is getting noisier images. But if you know your camera well enough, you’ll find the right value.

Learn more about ISO meaning and uses in photography. Leave the flash at home and experiment more.

  1. Don’t forget to select a slower shutter speed when adjusting the ISO sensitivity. If you want to capture a sense of speed or, on the contrary, to freeze the moment, we’ve got the best techniques for shutter speed photography explained here.
  2. Choose a wide aperture and shoot in RAW format if possible. This way you will avoid a reduction of the image’s saturation.

By increasing the aperture, more light will get into your camera’s lens. This will also result in a shallow depth of field. If you wish to learn more about how aperture affects the quality of your images, check out our article on aperture settings and techniques.

  1. Use a tripod. To get astounding night photographs, you need to control the composition of your shots. The easiest way to achieve great exposure is by keeping your camera still.

Consider Candid Photo Techniques

I cannot conceive Halloween photography in the absence of a few candid shots. Move around, experiment shooting from different angles, mix the perspectives, and be ready to take some unusual group pics.

Halloween Photography

Capture a Spider Trick

What I love about candid photography is that it doesn’t require posing. It is all about picturing how people interact and enjoy their time. Plus, candid photos add fun and a sense of story to the images.

Choose Your Time Wisely

Shooting in low light does not necessarily mean to wait until the night comes. Profit from the magical hour (actually, those 20 minutes before and after the sun goes down) and make your subjects look like fairy-tale characters.

This is also the perfect time to take incredible silhouette images by playing with shadows and backlighting. As a top tip, try taking photos of your subjects holding lit pumpkins. Position them against the sky at dusk for a more dramatic effect.

We’ve got more golden hour photography tips to help you find the best perspectives.

halloween photography - scary pumpkin

Halloween Scary Pumpkin – Autumnl Setting

Focus on Halloween Photography Props

Halloween pictures are all about capturing the spooky mood. Try setting up a bit the areas you photograph. Bring on the devilish cakes and spooky decorations.

What you can also do is find innovative ways to light your images. You know, this is the only time of the year when taking creepy photographs is entirely acceptable. Use flashlights, lit pumpkins, or glow sticks to accentuate the spooky traits of the characters your subjects impersonate by pointing them up, at their face. Also, you can photograph them with and without their masks.

Focusing on Halloween props shouldn’t be something static or boring. Besides a few close-ups of bleeding cakes and creepy cocktails, make Jack-o-lantern the main character of a time-lapse video. You can also capture the pumpkin’s transformation in a series of creative pics.

Dress-Up. Enjoy Halloween.

You cannot naturally interact with your subjects if not dressed-up. Play your role and you’ll make everyone feel more comfortable. Make it fun. Make it exciting. Don’t be afraid to go overboard with your shots. It’s Halloween!

Inspirational Portrait Photographers You Should Follow Today

What does it take to be one of the greatest portrait photographers in the world? Skill? Talent? Inspiration? Courage? These are all features you are about to discover at our favorite portrait photographers. Some of the professionals featuring our list are world-famous, some are well-known in smaller circles, some tell cultural stories, others more personal ones. But they all have something in common: a unique, thought-provoking and sometimes truly mind-blowing perspective both on the art of portraiture and life.

Our list of portrait photographers you should definitely know about is open to other entries as well. There are, of course, many more portrait photographers worthy of praise and admiration. That is why we cheerfully encourage our readers and followers to reach out to us with any thoughts, ideas or suggestions. Feel free to add names and stories to our lists of inspiring photographers from around the world. Write your own list and send it to us to be published!

Portrait Photographer: Adrian Blachut

Location:  Warsaw, Poland

Bio: Adrian Blachut is a Polish fine art portrait photographer who started his career in photography in 2007 after graduating economics and logistics. He is currently based in Warsaw, the capital of Poland, working as a commercial photographer and videomaker. His series of black & white portraits entitled ‘Faces’ is focused on what eyes say about people. You should definitely take a look at these expressive, intense photographs created in a classical artistic fashion.

Adrian Blachut portrait photographer

‘Faces’ Project © Adrian Blachut

Website: Adrian Blachut Photography, Facebook Official Page


Portrait Photographer: Lee Jeffries

Location:  Manchester, United Kingdom.

Bio: Seeing the street portraits signed by Lee Jeffries you would say he has studied photography for his entire life, but he did not. Lee Jeffries is an accountant currently living in Manchester. He became a self-taught and self-funded photographer about 7 years ago. The subjects of his portraiture are homeless people from various corners of the world. He started his photographic project entitled LOST ANGELS with the photograph of a woman praying in Rome, but his first street portrait was the one of a homeless girl on the streets of London.

This brilliant portrait photographer’s work is seen not simply as photojournalism or street photography, but as powerful spiritual iconography. What makes these black & white images of homeless people stand out is the photographer’s use of lights and shadows, as well as the powerful emotions behind the shots. His portraiture work is so emotionally charged that he even declared that: “When I’m talking to these people, I can’t then leave that emotion, so when I get back to my computer so emotionally involved, sometimes I will start to cry when processing the image”.

His work has been featured in top lists of street and portrait photography across the web and praised in major publications such as Time, the Independent, Guardian and Huffington Post.

New York by Lee Jeffries portrait photographer

New York © Lee Jeffries

Watch more of his images in this video.

Website: Lee Jeffries Portrait Photography on 500px.com, Lee Jeffries Photography Facebook Page.

Portrait Photographer: Cato Lein

Location:  Stockholm, Sweden.

Bio: Born in Båtsfjord, Norway, Cato Lein is currently based in Stockholm, Sweden. He is one of the most prominent and acclaimed Swedish portrait photographers, having worked for many publishing houses and magazines in Scandinavia. However, his photographic projects took his around the world. He is now working on a project in Poland. He has also exhibited portraits of Polish and foreign writers and translators in the past.

Cato Lein’s portrait photography is highly original, intense, and even provocative. His passion for powerful black & white imagery is his trademark. As concerns the way he approaches the art of portraiture, he says that:

“I often do two takes, one for the client and for myself. With my own, I test the limits of the possible – see how far I can go. This shot shows the person portrayed in a new way, never negatively but not flatteringly either. That’s what lots of my pictures are like: I’ve pushed the look in a direction that ends up surprising the models. Mostly, they like what I do and respect my artistic freedom.”

Norman Manea by Cato Lein portrait photographer

Norman Manea © Cato Lein

Website: Cato Lein Photography on Facebook, Instagram, Tumblr.


Portrait Photographer: Jimmy Nelson

Location: Amsterdam,  Netherlands and Ibiza.

Bio: Jimmy Nelson is a British photojournalist and photographer who traveled the world to document and photograph some of the most fantastic tribes left on the planet today. His vibrant and intriguing portraits of indigenous people taken in more than 44 countries around the globe have conquered our attention and admiration. Find out more about his stories and journey in Europe, Africa, South America, Asia and the South Pacific from his speech at TEDx Amsterdam.

before they pass away photo by jimmy nelson portrait photographer

‘Before They Pass Away’ Project © Jimmy Nelson

Website: Jimmy Nelson Photography.


Portrait Photographer: Nina Mašic-Lizdek

Location: Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Bio: Nina Mašic is a 24-year-old photographer and retoucher currently based in Sarajevo. She sees photography as a means of exploring and experiencing life with more intensity. Her images reveal different aspects of the world around us in pure beauty.

photo by nina masic portrait photographer

Photograph by Nina Masic

Website: Nina Mašic Photography, 500xp.com Page, Facebook Page, Instagram.


Portrait Photographer: Maja Topcagic

Location:  Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Bio: Maja Topcagic is the second portrait photographer born in Bosnia and Herzegovina featuring our list. She is currently working as a computer science teacher in Bihac, but also freelancing for Trevillion Images, 500px.com, Art+Commerce/Vogue Italia, and WIN New York.

She began her journey as a photographer at the age of 19 and since then she has invested energy both in hes passion for mathematics and photographic art. ‘Math and art are soulmates, and using these very natural things for a human being we can describe our world and our mind’, she says. It is better to let her images speak for themselves. Let’s take a look at one of  her beautiful, dreamy portrait.

blossom by maya toccagic portrait photographer

Blossom © Maja Topcagic

Website: Maja Topcagic Portfolio, 500px Page.


Portrait Photographer: Lisa Kristine

Location:  San Francisco, California.

Bio: Lisa Kristine is a highly appreciated humanitarian photographer. Part of her praised work showcases aspects of modern day human enslavement. She has also gained international recognition for capturing portraits of indigenous people from over 100 countries in six continents. ‘Few artists know how to capture the diversity and dignity of indigenous people. Lisa Kristine’s portraits exquisitely convey their silenced messages’, says Cosette Thompson, from Amnesty International. Lisa has explored the world in search of people, places and stories, creating unforgettable and meaningful images.

freedom, ghana by Lisa Kristine portrait photographer

Freedom, Ghana © Lisa Kristine

Website: Lisa Kristine Photography.


Portrait Photographer: Annie Leibovitz

Location: New York City, NY.

Bio: We have already featured Annie Leibovitz in our top fashion photographers list, as well as in out 10 famous photographers you should know about, but it is simply impossible not to mention her again as one of the most talented American portrait photographers today.

Meryl Streep photo by Annie Leibovitz portrait photographer

Meryl Streep © Annie Leibovitz

Website: Annie Leibovitz Photography on Tumblr.


Portrait Photographer: Joe McNally

Location: Ridgefield, Connecticut.

Bio: Joe McNally is an internationally acclaimed American photographer, author and instructor, listed by American Photo as one of the 100 Most Important People in Photography. He has worked as a photojournalist for 30 years now and shot cover stories for Time, Newsweek, New York, Fortune, Men’s Journal, National Geographic, LIFE and many more. He is the author of the first all-digital coverage of the history of the National Geographic, called ‘The Future of Flying’.

One of his noteworthy projects we want to bring into view is ‘Faces of Ground Zero’, created soon after the 9/11 tragedy, which is a collection of monumental, life-sized portraits of the heroes of September 11, 2001. As the official page of this projects reads, the photographs show ‘McNally’s brilliance as a photographer and his humanity in capturing everyday people in these historic moments’.

face of ground zero by joe mcnally portrait photographer

‘Faces of Ground Zero’ Project © Joe McNally

Website: Joe McNally Portfolio, Faces of Ground Zero Project.


Portrait Photographer: Katarina Smuraga

Location:  St. Petersburg, Russia.

Bio: Born in Vitebsk, Belarus, Katarina Smuraga is currently based in St. Petersburg, Russia. The images she creates are genuine and vivid, disturbing, yet refreshing. Katarina’s photos portray sensitive subjects and have an incredible emotional power.

photo by Katarina Smuraga portrait photography

Photograph by Katarina Smuraga

Website: Katarina Smuraga Photography on Flickr.

Image Sources: photographs featured in this article belong to the portrait photographers listed above and are protected by copyright. 

Creative Photo Ideas for Spring 2015

Here are some awesome creative photo ideas for you to try along with the necessary tips to achieve the looks and style in these photos. These are very useful for both professional photographers and amateur ones who want to have a little fun with some beautiful shots.

Shoot a daring fashion photo

Creative Photo Ideas

Seeing how winter is coming to an end, why not try to lift up everybody’s spirits by shooting a very vibrant and colorful image. This is a great technique used by Dan Comaniciu, a fashion photographer.

He says that you don’t have to make your model wear very brightly colored clothes or use a colorful backdrop, as it is quite easy to edit the whole picture in Photoshop.


Even though it’s very easy to edit the photos‘ colors in Photoshop, it helps to have the right lighting when taking the picture. The photographer used two Hensel lights along with strip soft boxes on the sides of his subject, at around 90 degree angles. This gives the subject a very special almost sculptural feel.

It’s very important to light your backdrop uniformly. Comaniciu made use of two flash lights, shot with the same levels through his soft boxes, pointed at the backdrop.

Creative Photo Ideas – Shoot Macro Photos

Creative Photo Ideas

Explore the miniature world that surrounds you. Macro photography lets you be creative and capture very beautiful images without leaving the comfort of your home.

There are a lot of subjects you can shoot by using macro photography. You may choose to go more traditional and shoot nature and flowers, or you may wish to use more abstract angles and shoot a regular object such as a spoon. Shooting water drops hitting a surface seems to work pretty well too.

There are some rules you must follow when shooting macro photography, though. To capture a great image you will need a macro lens with a ratio aspect of 1:1. However, if you don’t own something like this, you can improvise and connect an extension tube to whatever standard lens you have.

The aperture setting is one of the most important aspects when it comes to macro photography.

Because of the very close proximity in which you take your shot, the depth of field looks to be very low, even when you close the aperture.

A great technique used in macro photography is to take more shots with different exposures and different focus points and edit them all together to form a single sharp image.

Tips for the Creative Photo Ideas

You will need a tripod because you will be forced to shoot using a very narrow aperture setting.

You might want to use an additional light to make your subject look great. LED panels are a very easy and fast solution.

To end up with very sharp images make use of the Liveview feature and switch the setting of focus to manual. Make sure your focal point is very sharp before taking the shot.

Shoot people on the go

Creative Photo Ideas

Taking digital photography shots of random people on the street may seem a little challenging, but busy centers are filled with great opportunities to shoot great images of people on the go.

Photographer Adam Hinton made a trip to Tokyo to work on a personal project.

He said that his initial intention was to photograph people on the streets of Tokyo on their way to work. He wanted to make a purely esthetic project with no social commentary whatsoever. However, Adam did say after starting the project that people who are on their way to work often look focused, serious and very tired.

He shot the images by standing in the center of the busiest street in Tokyo in the morning rush. He took shots of every person who walked through a beam of light that he spotted in the crowd.


The photographer advises everyone not to be gimmicky in their approaches. You should avoid signs or humor and look at the subject aesthetically to understand what statement you’re making.

Don’t carry a lot of things with you as you will want to stay very light when shooting in a large crowd.

Shoot your local wildlife

Creative Photo Ideas

You don’t have to travel to Africa to get great shots of wildlife and Jamie Hall proves this with his amazing photographs.

He said he wanted to shoot deer in an urban location to stand out of the crowd and he went in different parks and woods in cities where deer usually were hiding. The photographer said that you must study their movements as they are creatures of habit. After studying them you will be able to predict where the animals will go.

He said that even though deer are going in urban environments they’re still very nervy animals and you won’t be able to get too close to them. You must really be aware of the creature’s habits to get great shots of the animal.


Do some research in order to find out where your local wildlife can be found.

Jamie said that in most shots he used shutter speeds of 1/30 seconds to 3 seconds. This means that you will have to take shots of the animal while it’s standing perfectly still.

Shoot a creative abstract

Creative Photo Ideas

You won’t have to travel very far to find some amazing shapes, patterns and textures in man-made environments and natural ones.

Mark Mason shoots what he refers to as threatened things, temporary things and hopelessly out of the way objects.

He explains that the textures, colors and shapes of an object are vessels such as words in a poem that helps him explain what he feels at the moment he’s taking the shot.

The image is shot in an auto graveyard close to Route 66. He chose not to photograph the rusty cars and instead captured fascinating textures and patterns in the metal of those cars.


For the image, he used a Canon EOS-3 with 135mm f/2 lens.

He doesn’t recall the exposure he used but says he mounted the camera on a tripod so most likely he used f/5.6 because that metal was flat.

It’s very important to have great lighting when taking the shot. Mark says he was standing in the shadow of a trailer but the dirt on the metal reflected the light coming from the sun evenly.

So there you have it. This was our list of some creative photo ideas for you to try this March.

Images source: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

3 Online Places that Give You the Best Photography Quotes

photography quotes

Susan Sontag said in her work On Photography that:

To photograph people is to violate them, by seeing them as they never see themselves, by having knowledge of them that they can never have; it turns people into objects that can be symbolically possessed. Just as a camera is a sublimation of the gun, to photograph someone is a subliminal murder – a soft murder, appropriate to a sad, frightened time.

Sometimes, a photographer needs inspiration. Blogs, people, nature, places will provide enough inspiration, but there are times when we crave more. When we just need some great photography quotes to keep up alert and motivated, where should we go? You could try the library, if you’ve got the time, but we suggest an easier and much more approachable solution: the internet. If you’re looking for inspirational photography quotes, then we’ve got just the thing for you. Here are 3 online places where you can get the best photography quotes.


GoodReads is the best quote repository you can find online. The great photography quote at the beginning of our article was taken from GoodReads. All you need to do is do a quick search and you are rewarded with a plethora of great, funny, short, long and inspirational photography quotes. It’s also the place where you’ve got all the important photography quotes by photography geniuses, such as Ansel Adams. GoodReads is also a really good website for finding black and white photography quotes, famous photography quotes and quotes about photography in general. Just customize your search and you’re given plenty of quotes about photography, love, life and death.


Tumblr is another place where you can find really nice and inspiring photography quotes. You do need to sign up for an account, but you can sign up in the blink of an eye! Tumblr is really the place to go for anything and everything, it’s uncensored, so if you’re looking for something a bit more alternative, it’s the place to go to.

Brainy Quotes

Brainy Quotes is the most comprehensive repository of quotes on the internet. There isn’t anything you can’t find on Brainy Quotes. Their photography quotes section is quite satisfactory and it will do the sorting by the author’s names. You can spend days searching their database and getting inspired, not just about photography, but about also about love and work, business and

We found this quote from Mario Testino, one of the biggest and most famous fashion photographers alive, on Brainy Quotes:

To me, the magic of photography, per se, is that you can capture an instant of a second that couldn’t exist before and couldn’t exist after. It’s almost like a cowboy that draws his gun. You draw a second before or after, you miss and you’re dead – not them. To me, photography’s always like that.

Other online places to find great photography quotes and sayings are Xanga, Pintrest, WikiQuote and even Facebook and with the help of their hashtag feature.

What to do with Photography Quotes?

We suggest that you gather them in a file or folder and keep them somewhere you can access them easily. Trust us, when it comes to inspiration, be it for a portrait or a wedding, you need as much help as you can get.

You can also share some quotes on your blog or your Facebook page, you know how much people love quotes!

Share your favorite photography quote with us in the comment section below, we would love to hear from you. Or better yet, tell us where you get your photography quotes from!

5 Maternity Photography Ideas for Expecting Clients

Becoming a mother is a special, special time in the life of a woman who chooses to walk that path. As cliché as it might sound, women who want a child and manage to become pregnant with one are truly experiencing a touch of the miraculous in their lives, and expecting couples are often so touched by this experience that working with them as a photographer can be the source of great inspiration. It is very often that these couples – or women – want to immortalize the special time they are currently experience through a beautiful photo shoot, and this is where you come in. If you take these few maternity photography ideas into account when you get contacted by expecting clients, the results will surely make them happy, and make you a better photographer in the process.

1. Combine the maternity photography niche with the boudoir photography niche.


Sometimes, the altered body appearance of a pregnant woman is the main thing which she wants to immortalize in the special photo session, and posing semi-naked for it almost comes naturally. Although for most photography outsiders, the ideas of maternity and of boudoir photography don’t mix very well, in professional practice they mix perfectly, and quite often (as we’ve shown you before in a post about boudoir photography). If you think about it, it actually makes perfect sense: a woman who wants to document her journey with professional photographs wants to beam with joy over her swollen belly, but wants to feel feminine and attractive too. Therefore, nude or semi-nude photos (perhaps just with a silhouette) are one of the best maternity photography ideas ever.

2. Make the belly important, but don’t make it your sole focus.

Styled maternity session at the Propel Workshop 2013

One of the most common novice mistakes when it comes to experimenting with maternity photography ideas is making the belly the main focus of each photo. Sure, the unborn baby is sort of the main point of the shoot, but if you center your photos on it, all of them will end up looking the same, and you will have missed other crucial aspects which should have been captured. Try alternating the focus and concentrate on other things like the people’s facial expressions, how your props are making the whole setting change and so on. Speaking of props, when shooting indoors in your studio (though it shouldn’t be a must, as we’ll develop further on later), some of the best maternity photography ideas include using unlikely pieces of furniture for comfortable poses. If the woman feels very comfy in an armchair, try creating the same pose with her in a kid’s wagon, for example, and so on.

3. When photographing couples, make the other partner feel important as well.

Butter Media Inc.

Another potential mistake you could make is to overlook the other partner or make them just a supporting character within the photos. Maternity photography ideas should be more than simply photographing the pregnant woman with her partner behind her and holding her or her belly. Ask them to play around until you find the potential for something funny, like the partner’s surprised facial expression being the focus of the photo, right next to the pregnancy itself. In real life as well as in photographs, the non-pregnant partner of expecting couples can sometimes feel like the third wheel, and it’s part of your job to counteract this effect in the photographs and make everyone feel like the united family they are.

4. Help your subjects relax and feel attractive.


Keep in mind that your subjects are not only non-professionals who don’t know how to pose and how to not get tired by it, but they are also pregnant women who may have some trouble feeling attractive during this delicate time. The better they feel while posing, the better will the photos be, so do our best to help them feel relaxed, to prevent exhaustion and to keep their spirits up.

5. Don’t settle for classic poses and try something creative.


Your first two or three couples who come to you for this kind of photos may challenge you enough just by requiring a classic maternity photo shoot, but after you become a bit more experienced in the field, you will soon notice how all studio photos will start looking more or less the same. After gaining a steady hand, try a more creative approach. Your artistry and your customers will both have to gain from the fresh view. For example, go outside the studio: try shooting the photos on the beach, if conditions will allow it, or simply somewhere outdoors. Some of the most creative maternity photography ideas we’ve seen around often involved being outdoors, so don’t be afraid to experiment. Have fun and good luck!

5 Sensible Ideas for Couples Boudoir Photography

During your career as a photographer working with people, if you manage to successfully transition from doing this as a hobby to becoming a pro, you will be approached by couples quite often. When two people feel happy together, when they are at the beginning or when they have simply reached a new relationship milestone, it is quite often that they want to celebrate that feeling by commissioning a series of couple photography. But on that note, you shouldn’t be surprised that sometimes they want to try couples boudoir photography, since it’s one of the most popular commercial trends of the present. It can’t be all wedding photography or classic portraits; but on the other hand you shouldn’t feel queasy about it: boudoir photography is by no means erotic photography, which is much more explicit or debatable. To prepare a bit for the time when you’ll receive a request like this, here are 5 sensible ideas for couples’ boudoir photography to achieve the ideal balance between enticing and tasteful.

1. Combine the niches of boudoir photography with maternity photography.


Sometimes, pregnant mothers want to contract a photographer to help them immortalize their new bodies in a beautiful light. It is a way for them to feel beautiful at a time when their bodies are going through miraculous and tremendous change, and you need to be highly imaginative as a photographer to be able to capture the exact angle that will produce a suitable photo. The final result must be neither too revealing or overtly sexy, nor too abstract, as if you don’t want to show the body at all, nor focusing entirely on the belly. The good news is that if you get this right, your client will love it, and you will add a very desirable niche to your portfolio.

2. Use lights and shadows to highlight only one area or shape of your subjects’ bodies.


When photographing bodies in a delicate and non-overtly erotic manner, the play of lights and shadows can be your friend. In the example above, the shadows help make the photo not too explicit, while the lights make the contours stand out in an alluring way. Tasteful boudoir photography can be easily achieved through light and shadow play, so it’s a trick you should keep in mind for every such photo shoot.

3. In couples’ boudoir photography, your people skills must be extra sharp.


Brushing up on your people skills to make sure your subjects are relaxed enough to pose and to also prevent their exhaustion is an important part of any kind of photography work, but in the case of boudoir photography, perhaps it is even more so. A person’s body is the thing they often are the most self-conscious about, and it is your job to make them feel as relaxed and comfortable as possible. They must feel so throughout the photo shoot, and the results have to make them feel beautiful. Perhaps a talk with your subjects about the body parts they feel most self-conscious about or the body parts which they are proud of and would like to bring into focus can prove itself useful, if you are as tactful about it a possible.

4. Try shooting the photos from partially concealing angles.


If you manage to tactfully find out what areas of their bodies your clients are comfortable with and what areas they would like concealed, you can use this as a guide. If there isn’t anything to be concealed for this reason, then just try to follow this rule of revealing something and concealing something else, in order to make sure the final result is tasteful and just slightly erotic. In couple’s boudoir photography, you have to deliver a result which will make your clients happy with their decision of posing for you even after a long while has passed.

5. As much of a cliché as it sounds, focus on the feeling of the overall setting than on the bodies per se.


The décor is very important in couple’s boudoir photography, as it will set the whole feeling for the entire series of photos. Not only will this feeling be visible to the viewer of the photos, but the subjects themselves must be successfully be immersed in it to relax properly and glow. This setting includes not only the objects in the room, but also the way you choose to frame the image you want to capture.

If you manage to apply these few ideas for couples’ boudoir photography, your clients should feel very happy with both the shooting experience and the results of your work, and your reputation as a reliable photographer will have nothing but to gain from it.

The Best Photographers We’ve Encountered Online in 2013-2014

Talking about something as definite as “best photographers “ can be more than a little bold, if truth be told, since the visual arts in general and photography in particular are so highly subjective that picking absolutes is impossible. But since we’re not claiming to choose the best photographers of all time, but only a few select ones which caught our eye since last year and the months that passed from this one, we dared to give it a go.

1. Davina Palik and Daniel Kudish


This couple of photographers, based in Montreal and Ottawa, specialize in wedding photography, taking beautiful pictures of couples around the world on their big day. Although wedding photography seem to be a field where you can’t improvise all that much, at least not in a completely innovate or shocking way, these two are some of the best photographers out there precisely because they can demonstrate the contrary.

Take a look at their superb portfolio here and see for yourself how fresh wedding photography can actually be with Davina and Daniel behind the camera. We especially love the occasionally funny moments captured, because one rarely gets to see something funny and romantic at the same time.

2. Spencer Murphy


For the portrait photography niche, our favorite is Spencer Murphy, one of the best photographers in Britain, in our humble opinion. We especially like the serious air of his portraits, because sometimes, there’s just more to the realm of photography themes than autumn foliage (not that there’s anything wrong with being into that). Pictured above, you can admire the portrait of a female jump jockey right after the jump (part of a wider series of specialized portrait, which won him impressive awards).

You can take a better look at this photo series of his here.

3. Rafael Marchante


This brilliant photographer from Portugal has reached a famous professional status on numerous websites after this iconic photograph of his was widely distributed in the aftermath of Nelson Mandela’s death. He managed to capture the spirit of the African leader’s legacy in a unique photograph of a well-made graffiti that was serious and playful and full of great impact all at the same time. His niche is taking pictures of seemingly banal street situations and homeless people, as opposed to most of our visitors who are mostly taking pictures of clients, but his images are a great inspiration nonetheless.

Take a look at his Facebook page here to browse some of the most amazing portraits you’ll ever see.

4. Camilla de Mafei


This brilliant Italian lady truly deserves a spot in the best photographers of recent years. Her work is hard to put into just one box, as she seems to move effortlessly through landscape photography, sad and eerie portrait photography or still life shots.

Her official website, where you can browse more of her photos, is here.

5. Michael Roud


One of the best photographers of Los Angeles, Michael Roud isn’t exactly a recent entry in the field of famous photography, but his works remain so edgy and impeccable that we couldn’t finish this list without him. Mostly into headshots (but also into wedding photography), he also impresses with his work as a director and with collaborations with celebrities. The one certainty about the work of this incredibly talented guy is that getting photographed by him is certainly an honor and privilege.

His official website and portfolio can be admired at will here.

These were, according to us, the best photographers of the recent years which you should check out every now and then for an inspiration bonus. All in all, there’s no improving your own skills without also getting familiarized with the work of as many photographers as possible, and they might as well be worthy of the attention.

5 Ways to Experiment More with Your Photography


Becoming a good photographer takes more than just hard work, mechanical knowledge of the basic know-hows and the investment of time and money. None of these things are easy to give, of course, especially if you’re striving to make the transition from an amateur to a pro while also maintaining an unrelated job and investing all your extra money in new gear and props to fuel your still not so lucrative hobby. But that little extra we’re talking about could be equated to the unquantifiable spark of talent, or confidence, or creativity which your work will eventually need to stand out from the crowd. Put in more technical and less romantic terms, in order to develop this sixth sense in photography and obtain better results, you need to experiment more with your work. Here are 5 ways to start.

Experiment more with the camera settings

As we mentioned earlier, it’s always a good idea to keep playing with your camera’s settings and discover new ways to make them work for the situation at hand. Nothing will give your imagination stronger wings than knowing every last effect obtainable from every last setting on your camera. Once you get to know them all and to know how your camera reacts to every possible combination of settings, you can experiment more in creative ways for pleasantly surprising effects.

Try new angles of viewing things

When approaching your usual subjects, establish your normal, go-to viewing angle and then try 2 or three completely different ones. You may be surprised of what you discover if you allow yourself to experiment more with the angles. The results may be better than what your usual approach would have produced, or, even if not, can prove to be valuable lessons in how you’ll perceive space through your lens.

Take photos of things out of your comfort zone

After you experiment more with the angles, it’s time to temporarily change your usual subjects as well. Try photographing things you wouldn’t normally think of photographing and see how your usual techniques are suitable or not for the new themes. We’re not suggesting you to go very far out of your comfort zone if you don’t want to (like to switch from wedding portraits to the morbid and grotesque), but trying something even a bit new as a subject can make you a better photographer once you return to your usual line of work.

Go wild with post-photo editing

Even if less is more when it comes to photo editing, you can play a bit with all the editor’s features just as you did with the camera settings. Even if the results are way over the top to count as decent pictures, if you experiment more with digital tools such as Photoshop or Picasa or whatever photo processing program you prefer, you will learn a great deal about what you can do with your photos in the future.

Try to work through the lens of another photographer for a short while

Every photographer, and especially the established ones, has their unique style, and trying to emulate it for a while can do you some good, even if it’s not a style you would like for yourself. Get familiar with two or three photographers who employ a very personal view, as different from each other as possible, and study their works. Then, for a week or so at a time, try to experiment more with your photos by channeling the style of each of them. Even if you won’t borrow anything from your muses on the long term, you will know yourself better as photographer by the end of this experiment and your enhanced knowledge will soon reflect positively in the quality of your photos.

How to Help Couples Relax in Photographs of Their Big Day

How to Help a Couple Relax in Photographs of Their Big Day Once a couple’s wedding day is here, their simply accepting to get married becomes a piece of cake comparing to the ordeal of getting photographed by a stranger. Well, this term is a bit harsh, but you get the picture. Never mind of you’ve known them your whole life or if you’ve just met them, you must be prepared for the worst-case scenario. You are just an outsider meant to mingle with their energy and show it all on camera. But it’s your job to help these couples relax in photographs  of their big day, photographs you are taking. People are different indeed, and so are the couples they form, and it goes without saying that life is better if you have a special someone to share it with, but what can you do, as a photographer witnessing their big day, to make things seem even more perfect than they could ever imagine? Here are some tips and tricks that are meant to keep the most self-aware bride focused on what you really need in order to take the perfect picture. For a more professional tutorial, find out more here.

Give Them Something To Do

How to Help a Couple Relax in Photographs of Their Big Day2 As a general rule, you should never leave your models without a focus point. Professional models are perfectly capable of finding their own concentration points, but as a wedding photographer, chances to work for professional models are quite seldom. So don’t get your hopes up high, but instead develop this simple trick that’s sure to work in every situation. No matter whom you are dealing with, just put your subjects to work. Ask them to tell jokes, to sing, to jump, to surprise each other, to tickle one another, basically any amusing action that crosses your mind. Take advantage of the fact that they can rely on each other. You can also apply this rule when you have to shoot separate frames, with just one member of the couple. Be creative. The explanation is quite simple: once your couple forgets about your being there, instead of struggling to capture natural and genuine beauty, it will just pop out! No one can act natural, they can either be natural or pretend. And we all know how the latter looks like. Not cool.

Make Them Think of Something Nice

How to Help a Couple Relax in Photographs of Their Big Day3 Well, some couples may be too agitated to think of games, or too excited, or too stressed, or too shy… But don’t panic, there’s always a plan B! Here is a softer version of the solution presented above. For introverts, try to delicately guide them into certain states of mind. Instead of bluntly asking them to stare into your lens, with an uptight smile on their faces, try to make them fall into pleasant states of mind.  Get them to tell you the story of how they met, or the day they decided to get married, or the best holiday they’d had so far, or about their honeymoon plans, etc. A nice mental image can always be seen in their eyes as well, and there you go! That’s your Kodak moment! When asked to think happy thoughts, people de-focus from the actual purpose of their being there. Therefore they will stop being uptight, because they will completely forget about you and focus on what made them happy at one time.

Don’t Forget That You Are Also in the Pictures

You’ll just need to click a button, and your work of art is complete. True, but not quite. It goes without saying that genuine human interaction can help you get the best of any situation. And that includes you as well. As a photographer, you are not only an invisible witness, but also an important part of the context. Even though no one seems to care about this, your not appearing in your photos does not mean that you are not there. So in order to help couples relax in photographs, be present, be warm and offer more of your presence in order to get the best from your models.

Use Your Camera’s Depth of Field Better

The manual settings on your camera, if used right, can lead to far more marvelous photos than those done with the auto settings. It’s really quite unfortunate that most DLSR cameras come today with advanced auto settings, because it enables most users to postpone actually learning a thing or two about what the manual settings actually do and how they can be aligned to work together for perfect results. Don’t be one of those lazy would-be photographers who stick to the predefined options, as that will never lead to better than average photos. One of the first things you should learn to use better is the so-called triangle of camera exposure, composed of ISO, shutter speed and aperture. It can truly make the difference between average photos at best and good photos at least. But after learning more about those basics, the next thing which can influence your final photos for the better is your camera’s depth of field variable, a sub-setting within the aperture setting.

What is the Depth of Field?

The depth of field, usually abbreviated with an f-number, is something directly derived from the aperture of your camera. As a reminder, your camera’s aperture is the size of the hole within the lens, through which light travels to the inside of the camera. Considering that cameras are made following the model of the human eye, you could say that the aperture corresponds to the eye’s pupil, since they serve the same purpose of allowing light in. A bigger camera usually has a larger hole, and a smaller camera usually has a smaller hole. A larger hole equals a bigger aperture, while a smaller hole equals a lower aperture. The aperture of a camera is also expressed through an f number, with a higher number signifying a smaller aperture and vice-versa. This might seem counter-intuitive to some of you, but it can be easier sunk in if you look at this chart (pictured below). The white circles in it represent the size of the lens aperture, while the f numbers written below them illustrate the rule: the larger the number, the smaller the aperture signified will be.


The depth of field is the size of the field that looks sharp in a photograph, and it is directly dependent on the aperture.  A large depth of field number (like f/28) will bring all the foreground and background objects into focus equally, while a smaller number (signifying a larger aperture) will bring only the foreground objects into focus, making the background of the photo appear blurry. A good illustration of this effect can be observed in the picture below. As you might have guessed, this is how those wonderful photos with faded backgrounds are made with, and it is indeed a wonderful effect to use. A skilled manipulation of a camera’s depth of field allows the photographer to emphasize whatever their heart’s desire is within a photo, and to make sure the viewers “see” the same thing the photographer has seen when they look at the image.


Even though a camera’s aperture sounds like more or less of a hardware property, since it depends on the size of the hole and the lens, the aperture can be somewhat manipulated, within a minimum and maximum limit. Each camera comes with these min and max values stated in the manual or in the specifications of your lens, if you bought yours separately from the camera. The depth of field can be thus adjusted by adjusting the camera’s aperture, and you should play with it as often as possible to obtain better or more creative photos on the long run. Don’t be afraid to experiment, after a while you’ll get the feel of it and you’ll be able to employ the depth of field to create beautiful images seamlessly, just by following your gut. Good luck and have fun.