3 Habits Of Highly Unsuccessful Photographers

Plenty is written on successful companies and how you do things the right way. But I find it equally helpful to go in the opposite direction once in a while and discover things that businesses do wrong. You know, the things that really hold people back and prevent them from creating a sustainable, successful photography studio.

By understanding what factors some people have that limit success, you can begin to generate new ideas and ultimately find a better way of doing things.  If you look at failing or even businesses that have failed in the last few months, most of them would cite reasons that would fall under one of these key inhibitors.

1. They believe their current circumstances are unchangeable – they must accept them no matter what.

2. They reorganize so much they never establish a true clientele.

3. They do not test and evaluate to determine when its time to change.

Unchangeable Circumstances

Opportunities exist in every circumstance. Yet for many people, they get caught in the rut of what’s happening in the world around them and forget they can change and manipulate things any way they choose.

Now is the perfect time to find “old time” photographers who fall into this category. Talk to them for two minutes and you’ll start to see the patterns. They’ll say things like “things are rough and nobody wants photography any more” or “everyone wants a CD with digital files for virtually no money at all”. They look at the world as if they are living in the past. They’ve always made a great living in the “old” way and they simply can’t find a way to turn it around and continue to make a great living in today’s world.

Constant Reorganization

This type of photographer searches and learns from everyone around them. They always believe the “up and coming” trends and jump on them to try them out.

Unfortunately, none of it ever works. Everything you do with your business takes time to put it into action. If you change your mind, your style or your approach again and again, you confuse those around you, whether it’s your clients, your prospects or even your employees.

No Testing and Evaluating

This type of photographer will put something into action and leave it in place, no matter what. It might work. It might not. Whether its out of stubbornness, lack of creativity, or simply lack of motivation, this type of photographer will feel like at least if they are doing something, something along the way will eventually work.

Dig Deeper: Photographer Coaching

They don’t realize that by testing and evaluating things, they might find something’s work very well, and some things not at all. They don’t realize that by tweaking a few things they could double their traction and ultimately their profits.

Do you see yourself in any of the three above?

If so, you can change it. Part of working on your business mindset is discovering things that can ultimately be standing in your way. Once you discover what that is, you simply work to change your approach. For instance, if you know you are always jumping at the latest trend, and approaching different types of customers, stop. Choose your niche and target market today and stick with it for one year. Tweak things but don’t change them. They evaluate and see if your business is any better off a year from today than it is right now.

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About Virtual Photography

We're the co-founders of VirtualPhotographyStudio.com and have been writing on this blog since 2004. We started Virtual as a way to help photographers stretch beyond a part time income, and develop strategies to become a Five Figure Photographer or a Six Figure Photographer. Ultimately its all about lifestyle, and if your goal is to live as a photographer 24/7, we think you should have the knowledge and the tools to do so. Welcome!

Comments

  1. My partner said something three months ago that made me start to pay attention to aperature. I had a series of pics that were good…but it could have been better.

    The nice thing is that I was focusing on one part of the photograph……but he made me start to look at another part of the photograph. It really helped.